«

»

Oct 23

Hotel Scarface: Where Cocaine Was King And Everyone Had Their Minds Blown

6198X1huD9L__SX331_BO1,204,203,200_Hotel Scarface reads like a fictional accounting of what happened at the Mutiny Hotel in Miami. What happens is a cocaine, unreality of a real life story—actually numerous stories of the criminals, women, wait staff and the cops who finally took the cocaine cartel down.

Roben Farzad writes the story of a lifetime about sex, drugs and rock and roll. It’s a who’s who list of A-listers, actors, actresses, singers, musicians such as Rick James, and the Miami Vice actors who partied at the Mutiny. All of this happens starting in the mid-1970’s and goes until the 1980’s.

Farzad tells the story as if he were actually there seeing it all happening and participating in the action. What happens is an excess of drinking champagne, partying and doing boatloads of cocaine.

The preface of Hotel Scarface, named after the movie starring Al Pacino who apparently  hung out at the Mutiny Hotel in Miami is a who’s who of famous names. Scarface was filmed at the hotel. It’s unreal discovering who partied the nights and days away riding the White Pony. It’s also disgusting discovering how many successful people did cocaine, gaining a euphoric high making them feel like they could do anything and everything. And in that doing everything world of the Mutinity , the men and women used each other for numbed glorification.

The wait staff had to dress a certain way, and the hired girls were paid little money to do what they apparently loved doing:cocaine, men and drinking champagne.

Hotel Scarface reads like a movie, but really doesn’t read like a story at all. Farzad keeps listing names, throwing in famous people, Cuban cartel members and cops who blow them all in, but doesn’t really just tell one story. It’s as If Farzad is so intrigued by what happened as he says before he was born, that he continually tells what happened in a I have to get this information out there method.

Don’t get me wrong, Hotel Scarface is a really good book , but it does get mind blowing naming all of the A-listers who did cocaine, partied their money away and kept going on the all powerful, stimulating drug—cocaine.

Leave a Reply